A Companion to Philosophy of Religion by Charles Taliaferro, Paul Draper, Philip L. Quinn

By Charles Taliaferro, Paul Draper, Philip L. Quinn

In eighty five new and up-to-date essays, this accomplished quantity presents an authoritative consultant to the philosophy of religion.

  • Includes contributions from validated philosophers and emerging stars
  • 22 new entries have now been additional, and all fabric from the former variation has been up to date and reorganized
  • Broad assurance spans the components of worldwide religions, theism, atheism, , the matter of evil, technology and faith, and ethics

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Its most influential exposition may be found in a work called Abhidharmakosa (“Treasury of Abhidharma”), probably composed in India in the fourth century ce by Vasubandhu (for a translation see Pruden 1988–90). According to this theory, objects that appear to be extended in space or to last longer than an instant are in fact composed of collocations of dharmas, either aggregated in space or strung together causally through time. Further, proponents of this ontology are typically interested in providing a catalog or list of the kinds of dharma there are, and then of accounting for medium-sized physical objects – trees, say, or tables – in terms of the different kinds of dharma that may be found aggregated or connected causally in them.

Chinese “fatalism” is an aspect of their normative theory coupled with their naturalism. This makes translators use different terms in rendering the key term ming (to name, command) (used in “mandate” of tian). Usually they gloss it as “order” or “command,” though most accept the theory that it is the verbal form of ming (name). , “naming” the ruler (and charging him with responsibility). What is missing is any analog of argument from a creator’s intent, divine foreknowledge, or a concept of deterministic laws.

If, on the other hand, we focus on the moral doctrine interpretation of dao, we can read such passages as a version of linguistic idealism. , being and non-being) are conventionally “carved out” for practical purposes by our guiding discourse. We can view daos creating and sustaining “things” as blending this idealism with the commonsense view that a natural “guide” nurtures and develops things. 26 chinese confucianism and daoism Both explanations of “things” would fail if they relied on the claim that Daoists ground their religion on a mystical experience (see Chapter 48, Religious Experience).

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